This tutorial demonstrates how to weave in the two-layer warping (2LW) manner and end up with four signature Weave-It scalloped edges. It’s just as easy as regular 2LW (if that’s any consolation), so don’t feel intimidated. (The first method I came up with was way, way worse!)

This 2″ 2LW square was woven in the “way, way worse” method of achieving four scallop edges

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How to make a buttonhole—I learned this nifty trick from a book on rigid heddle weaving and saw that it would easily adapt to pin loom weaving.

Before plunging in with buttonholes on your treasured project, it’s a good idea to practice first. Read More →

This particular blog post began as notes to self, so it might not make a lot of sense. However, it might be useful if you want to try weaving “Box of Stars” and other 2LWsq (or L2M) patterns from the library. (One benefit of manipulating L2 is that you can design centered patterns instead of running them unevenly off the top of the woven square.)

2LWsq means Two-layer warping / two-layer weaving. Warp L1 and L3, then weave L2 and L4 (or L4 then L2) in alternating rows instead of rows 1-31 consecutively. It’s a way to end up with scalloped edges instead of single wrapped edges when weaving 2LW patterns. You can then combine 2LW squares with 3LW squares in a project and use the Mattress Stitch to join them.

Box of Stars

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Someone on the Facebook Pin Loom Weaving Support Group asked me the difference between single-layer warping (1LW) and two-layer warping (2LW): Why couldn’t you lay all the warps side by side instead of going through the two-layer process?

Reasonable question. After all, wouldn’t you prefer to have the top and bottom edges match the side edges? (With 2LW you get the characteristic Weave-It scallop along the top and bottom edges of your square while the sides look more like wire wrapping a post.)

I laid out a square with all the warps side by side and counted to make sure I had 31. In hindsight, I could have moved the warp at Cr3 over to the second pin. I also could have tried warping beginning at Cr4 or Cr3 or Cr2 … or even one of the sides (it’s like anarchy, isn’t it, when you abolish the rules?) I didn’t like the unvertical way it looked, but it’s interesting that weaving begins at Cr4—if you don’t tie on a second color. If you do tie on a second color, you could add it at any corner (more anarchy!).

Single-layer warping

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This post begins a series of two-layer warping (2LW) instructions. I haven’t done much exploring of this weaving method, and haven’t invented many patterns yet. There are a number of patterns available in 100 Pin Loom Squares by Florencia Campos Correa and there are a few available in the vintage pattern booklets on eLoomaNation.com. And I’m in the process of inventing more.

Please check out my video series demonstrating the techniques described in this and the following posts.

2LW Part 1—Basic Twill
2LW Part 2—Twill Changing Direction

INSTRUCTIONS FOR ONE-COLOR SQUARE—two options

(I’m using stretchy wool for these squares, so it’s OK to warp more snugly.)

Samples featuring pink yarn and the Zoom Loom are the most basic method for 2LW. If you want to eliminate all the fancy distractions, follow those photos. By the way, if you are a Zoom Loom user, I strongly recommend you purchase a longer needle to make weaving more comfortable with its wide frame.

The turquoise yarn/cream-colored Weave-It photos will show how to prepare the loom if you wish to work the beginning yarn tail in as you weave. It also shows a warping variation at Cr2 that might make weaving a bit easier.

1) BASIC ONE-COLOR WARPING

Anchor the yarn tail in the notch at Cr1. (If using a different loom you can tie a slip knot, leave the yarn tail hanging, or use a method that suits you.) Warp L1 as usual. Finish at Cr2.

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