I’ve been putting off writing this one because I thought I already had. Unlike the method in Part 5, I actually like this one a lot and have found it quite useful. For patterns that have a lot of O3s combined with U3s—particularly those with the U3/O3, O3/U3 star motif—this is a great warping configuration. (You can also use L1/2-4 for such patterns, but L1&2/3&4 will usually look better). I plan to post several new patterns soon that will show examples using this warping method (see Lattice Borders and variations for examples).

Lattice Borders variation 1—this method is the tidier method

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I may eventually say the same thing for all the two-layer, two-color warping configurations; I don’t use them often, but it’s useful to know how to do them when you want them. This one is probably my least favorite warping configuration which is interesting to me because it’s the same configuration generally used on a rigid heddle loom—warp one color, weft another. If you want to practice a weaving pattern you have in mind for a rigid heddle project, this pin loom warping configuration should be useful for that—especially if every odd row in your RH project is plain weave.

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It’s ridiculous to keep writing the same information over and over, but it seems sensible to have a series of two-color weaving posts in consecutive order on this blog. The information in this post is reprinted and slightly updated from a post previously published on Windsweptmind.com. If you want basic information on changing colors for layer 4 (L4) only, visit that post.

This series addresses changing colors and …

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