First of all—and this is easy to overlook; I often make the l-to-r mistake when I forget to pay attention to what I’m doing—READ ROW INSTRUCTIONS LEFT-TO-RIGHT ON EVEN ROWS, RIGHT-TO-LEFT ON ODD ROWS.

These colors usually appear only on three-layer warp (3LW) patterns:

Red = UNDER

Blue = OVER

White or Gray PLAIN weave

Green = optional Under

Light Blue = optional Over — not used very often

Here are some examples:

Star Valley

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By no means do I consider myself an expert adviser on the subject of making patterns pop. I’ve made a lot of squares—enough to know that there are no rules, or if there are, they elude me. If I say, “Use high contrast,” along comes a pattern to defy that rule—it’ll show up better in two subtle tints of the same color. (I have such a square in my collection, but can’t readily lay hands on it.) And don’t get me started on “Use complementary colors”—that rarely works.

Because I have too many squares and it’s been waaaay too long since I looked at most of them, I’ve decided to limit my subject today to the topic of using variegated yarn in pattern weaves.

First, let me say I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE variegated yarn, but I think it looks best in plain weave squares. Read More →

How to make a buttonhole—I learned this nifty trick from a book on rigid heddle weaving and saw that it would easily adapt to pin loom weaving.

Before plunging in with buttonholes on your treasured project, it’s a good idea to practice first. Read More →

The alphabet and numbers sets are now finished. The best way to find all of them in one place is by visiting the Topical Guide, under the heading Letters and Numbers. Click on the desired pattern and you’ll go right to it.

These 13 squares represent an all-night effort to finish two basic sets of patterns—ABCs and 123s.

The numbers and letters can also be found by clicking on the Alphabet or Numbers category, but they won’t show up in alphabetical or numerical order (rather by the date on which they were published).

OR you can find them all here:

Letters and Numbers

 

MEASURING WEFT (L4)

First, check the PIN WRAPS AND YARDAGE page (see tab at the top of this blog) to see if I’ve already figured it out for you.

If your loom size isn’t covered there, or if you’re on a desert island (you brought your pin loom weaving supplies of course) and don’t have access to the Internet, I’ve discovered a Helpful Hack for measuring weft.

Here is a sample loom with the first three layers in place. (By the way, I DO NOT recommend warping your loom tightly as shown–I warped it tight for the sake of the photos.)

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