Have to say, this one didn’t turn out as I’d hoped. (It’s been redesigned and needs to be rewoven.) In its defense, I designed it on graph paper–long before I began designing with charts on the computer–using the palest pencil imaginable. It was hard to see the diagram to transfer it to digital media, so I can only imagine (because I can’t remember) how difficult it must have been to design. Apparently I had no trouble following my nearly imperceptible graphite marks because I wove what I wrote. Nevertheless, while transcribing the pattern I decided to make some improvements (untested at this point, but I’m certain they’re improvements).

Before I could transfer the semi-visible drawing to the computer, I thought I’d better get a look at the original so I could know what I was trying to copy. Here’s a rough sketch of what Road to Tennessee looked like in my quilt block book.

Road to Tennessee sketch

Read More →

You know the saying, “When the teacher is ready the students appear”? (Or is it the other way around? I think it is. As a freelance teacher I always tend to wonder if students will show up…) I’ve been having a recurring idea and I guess I’ve been in need of a nudge.

So, students, show up, please.

I mean, there’s just SO MUCH to work on all the time. Do y’all really want me to stop working and start organizing?

Read More →

By no means do I consider myself an expert adviser on the subject of making patterns pop. I’ve made a lot of squares—enough to know that there are no rules, or if there are, they elude me. If I say, “Use high contrast,” along comes a pattern to defy that rule—it’ll show up better in two subtle tints of the same color. (I have such a square in my collection, but can’t readily lay hands on it.) And don’t get me started on “Use complementary colors”—that rarely works.

Because I have too many squares and it’s been waaaay too long since I looked at most of them, I’ve decided to limit my subject today to the topic of using variegated yarn in pattern weaves.

First, let me say I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE variegated yarn, but I think it looks best in plain weave squares. Read More →

MEASURING WEFT (L4)

First, check the PIN WRAPS AND YARDAGE┬ápage (see tab at the top of this blog) to see if I’ve already figured it out for you.

If your loom size isn’t covered there, or if you’re on a desert island (you brought your pin loom weaving supplies of course) and don’t have access to the Internet, I’ve discovered a Helpful Hack for measuring weft.

Here is a sample loom with the first three layers in place. (By the way, I DO NOT recommend warping your loom tightly as shown–I warped it tight for the sake of the photos.)

Read More →

Someone on the Facebook Pin Loom Weaving Support Group asked me the difference between single-layer warping (1LW) and two-layer warping (2LW): Why couldn’t you lay all the warps side by side instead of going through the two-layer process?

Reasonable question. After all, wouldn’t you prefer to have the top and bottom edges match the side edges? (With 2LW you get the characteristic Weave-It scallop along the top and bottom edges of your square while the sides look more like wire wrapping a post.)

I laid out a square with all the warps side by side and counted to make sure I had 31. In hindsight, I could have moved the warp at Cr3 over to the second pin. I also could have tried warping beginning at Cr4 or Cr3 or Cr2 … or even one of the sides (it’s like anarchy, isn’t it, when you abolish the rules?) I didn’t like the unvertical way it looked, but it’s interesting that weaving begins at Cr4—if you don’t tie on a second color. If you do tie on a second color, you could add it at any corner (more anarchy!).

Single-layer warping

Read More →