Wall Bars designs use the Slide technique. Slide means that the needle slides between the warp layers rather than going Under the L1 warps or Over the L3 warps. The L4 weft thread will be in between the warps alongside the L2 threads on either side of it. When I count the slide stitches, I tap them with my needle to keep track of them.

Wall Bars 3, variation A

Wall Bars 3, variation A1

Read More →

Wall Bars designs use the Slide technique. Slide means that the needle slides between the warp layers rather than going Under the L1 warps or Over the L3 warps. The L4 weft thread will be in between the warps alongside the L2 threads on either side of it. When I count the slide stitches, I tap them with my needle to keep track of them.

Wall Bars 4 variation A

Wall Bars 4 variation A

Read More →

Several names suggested themselves to me for this design—most containing some form of the word diamond. In the end I decided to name it after Dame Diana Rigg who starred in the movie I watched while weaving this square. (I was watching In This House of Brede, based on the book of the same name by Rumer Godden. I could go into my lifelong obsession with Rumer Godden’s writing, but won’t. I enjoyed the movie very much. It was very thought-provoking.)

Diana

Read More →

Judie Eatough won’t take credit for this pretty weaving draft, but she readied it for the pin loom and brought it to our attention. These are her comments: “Here is a pattern for the dogwood blossom that is a traditional Atwater-Bronson lace pattern. This one uses 3 thread warp floats. The photo is of the unwashed square done in acrylic yarn. The petals round some because the plain weave pushes into the lace areas. Use a yarn that gives you a firm plain weave square.”

Dogwood, woven by Judie Eatough

Read More →